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Monthly Archives: August 2017

Deadly Effects of Hypertension

Stroke – Stokes are caused when a certain part of the brain becomes deprived of nutrients and oxygen, which then leads to the death of previously healthy brain cells. Hypertension can lead to strokes as it weakens blood vessels in the brain, eventually resulting in them narrowing, weakening, or even rupturing altogether. Another reasons why strokes can be caused by hypertension is the fact that it can lead to the formation of blood clots in arteries leading to the brain, meaning that the brain doesn’t get enough oxygen or nutrients.

Diabetes – Although hypertension doesn’t cause diabetes, it can greatly exasperate the side effects associated with diabetes. For example, diabetes already damages the arteries, weakening them and putting them for at risk. When you factor in hypertension as well, the already weakened arteries simply cannot cope, resulting in hardening of the arteries. Diabetics also suffer from poor circulation, which is another side effect associated with hypertension.

Heart disease – Heart disease, or cardiovascular disease is another very common side effect of hypertension. As the heart is responsible for pumping blood all around the body, high blood pressure can lead to a number of irregularities. Hypertension results in a lack of blood being transported to the heart, which can lead to irregular heartbeats, chest pains, or even a heart attack. Enlargement of the left side of the heart is another common side effect of hypertension, due to the fact that the left ventricle in the heart can become stiff and thickened, affecting the heart’s ability to pump blood and therefore causing it to become enlarged.

Eye disease – The eyes are also commonly affected as a result of hypertension mainly because tiny blood vessels in the eyes can become damaged. This can lead to retinopathy, which is a condition which can cause blurred vision, bleeding in the eye, or even complete loss of vision. Nerves in the eye are also damaged due to hypertension, particularly the optic nerve.

Kidney disease – The kidneys act as filters for our blood, filtering out impurities to keep it as healthy as possible. With hypertension however, as the blood flows much faster through the kidneys, and in much larger volumes, this can force them to work twice as hard and can result in them becoming worn down. Over time, it can even result in full kidney failure, resulting in them shutting down completely.

Atherosclerosis – Perhaps better known as artery disease, atherosclerosis is a very common side effect of hypertension, resulting in damage to the walls and lining of the arteries which in turn causes them to harden. The increase in blood pressure can wear away at the lining of the arteries, making them weaker and more vulnerable. This can eventually lead to the arteries becoming hardened, resulting in blocked blood flow to the other vital organs in the body.

Getting Enough Sleep

More and more scientific research is coming out showing the importance of sleep, and how detrimental lack of sleep is to your health. Recent research has found that people who routinely sleep less than seven hours per night have 21-26% higher chance of dying of any cause, than people who routinely sleep more than eight hours per night.

Every single animal sleeps. There are no animals that do not sleep. Biologically, that means sleep is as important as breathing and eating.

There’s been some fascinating brain research recently that found out more about how the brain works and what it does at night. I was astounded when I read it. When we’re active during the day, working, exercising, and doing our daily activities, we’re heavily using our brain functions. This causes a build up of toxins and chemical byproducts that naturally occur as part of that process. When we sleep at night, the brain actually pumps through a nightly “wash cycle”, like a dishwasher, that washes out those toxins and built up byproducts from the day. Just stop and think about that for a moment. What happens if you don’t wash your dishes thoroughly? Lots of crud builds up. Now think about that happening in your brain. What do you think happens when lots of toxins and crud build up in the brain? Is it going to have an impact on brain function and health? Absolutely. If you don’t get enough sleep at night, the wash cycle doesn’t run properly.

Decades of sleep research show that eight hours of sleep per night is the magic number. Kids and teenagers need a little bit more.

In Chinese Medicine, we want to balance yin and yang in the body to restore and maintain health. Yang energy provides the heat, fire, and functional activity in the body. Daytime is yang time. It’s warm, light and the time when we’re busy going about our daily activities. Many of us end up acting “too yang”, that is, go, go, going all the time, without enough “down time” or time to rest and rejuvenate the body (and mind and spirit, for that matter).

Yin energy is the cooling, moistening, nourishing energy in the body. Night is yin time, when it’s cooler, dark, and quiet. During yin time, our body naturally needs to be quiet and rest, in order to replenish itself from the activities of the day. What happens when you stay up too late, do too much, and don’t rest enough? You overwork, burn up the yin energy, and feel tired. The yin/night/ rest time is just as important as the yang/active time! Unfortunately, all of our great technology to make us more efficient, instead of giving us more leisure time, has made us do much more stuff in less time. We’re always trying to fit in one more thing that we can get done before we go to bed.

If you think doing more stuff is more important than sleeping, consider the research mentioned above. And, research has shown that those who don’t get enough sleep (less than 8 hours) gain more weight, and there’s an increase in heart attacks in those who don’t get enough sleep.

As you can see, eight hours of sleep per night really is important. Tonight, consider whether you really need to do one or two more things before bed. Do you really need to stay up and watch the end of the movie or finish reading the book tonight? Plan your time at night, just like during the day. What time do you need to go to bed in order to get eight hours of sleep? If you start watching the TV program or movie, will it end in enough time to let you get in bed at your target bedtime? Set an alarm if you need to, to tell you to stop whatever you’re doing and get ready for bed. It’s a matter of creating good habits and training your body when it’s time to stop and go to sleep. Never work in bed.

Diabetic Foot Care

a) Check your feet daily for cuts, sores, red spots, swelling and infected nails.

b) Do not cut corns and calluses( hardened or thickened part of the skin). Consult your doctor if you have developed corns and calluses rather than cutting them off using razor, corn plasters or some liquid corn removers.

c) Make sure your toe nails are trimmed properly. Trim them straight across and smooth them using a nail file.

d) If you are diabetic, consult your doctor. Diabetic patients are at more risk to developing foot complications and wounds which do not heal easily. There are three major problems which a diabetic person faces if he develops some foot disease.

. Ischemia: It is poor circulation of blood.

. Neuropathy: It is a nerve disease.

. Infection: Precipitation Factor.

Tip: Keeping your blood sugar level in good control and taking care of your feet properly can help you avoid serious foot problems. Also avoid sitting with your legs crossed as it can reduce the flow of blood to the feet.

e) Scrub your feet each time you take a shower. You can also wash them using mild soap and lukewarm water and then drying them gently.

f) Wear clean socks and shoes that fit you properly. Right shoes helps you put off injuries and soreness. If you feel your feet sweat more than others, go in for leather or canvas shoes but not synthetic ones or plastic shoes. Plastic or vinyl shoes do not stretch or breathe. Sandals are also a good option. Use foot powder daily.

Exercising With Hypothyroidism

Build muscle – this may be the last thing on your exercising to-do list. But building muscle is important in many ways. Not only will you be strong, but having more muscle has been proven to burn more fat by increasing metabolism, even when you are at rest.

There are lots of exercises you can use to build muscle. If you would like to do them at home, then you can buy free weights to use. Alternatively, you can build muscle with strength training exercises. These include pushups, lunges, leg raises, and squats. If these aren’t for you, then visit any nearby gym; you will find a good selection of equipment aimed at building muscle.

Get motivated to exercise – when just getting started with exercise, you will likely be very motivated. You will see yourself exercising every day. However, it does not take long before all this motivation disappears. And you may soon find yourself sedentary.

But there are lots of tricks you can use to keep your motivation. One of them is by listening to music while you exercise. This makes the workout fun and it distracts you so you don’t pay attention to your exhaustion.

Secondly, you can also try working out with friends. Just make sure that your goals are not broadly different. This will ensure that you do the same exercises most of the times.

Create fitness goals – it is pointless to start exercising without first having a goal; you won’t know what you would like to gain in the end. And chances of losing your motivation are high.

Are you trying to lose weight? Do you want to build muscle? Whatever it is that you want, make sure that it’s specific. And it helps to write it down so you can look at it at least once a day.