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Information of Prehypertension

Prehypertension is when your blood pressure levels are slightly elevated above what they should be, and is often a precursor to hypertension, which basically means that, if left untreated and unaddressed, prehypertension will eventually lead to hypertension. When a person suffers with prehypertension, their systolic (top) number reading will be 120 mmHg-139 mmHg, or their diastolic (bottom) number reading, will be 80 mmHg – 89 mmHg.

Prehypertension is actually, a very worryingly, a very common health condition with more than 50% of all adults aged 18 or above, suffering with either hypertension, or prehypertension. In the USA alone for example, a staggering 59 million people are believed to suffer with prehypertension, and those numbers are increasing every single day. So then, you may conclude that prehypertension is an indirect result of aging and growing older, although experts say that this is not the case at all. In some parts of the world for example, some countries will see virtually no increases in hypertension or prehypertension as people grow older. For this reason then, the most obvious cause is considered to be poor lifestyle choices.

As you can now see, prehypertension is not to be taken lightly and should be taken very seriously. Some of the main risks associated with prehypertension include:

Increased chance of hypertension – This is the most obvious risk of prehypertension, as the condition itself is a precursor to hypertension. Put simply, if the condition is not addressed, it will eventually lead to hypertension and all of the health complications associated with high blood pressure, which all have the potential to be fatal.

Cardiovascular disease risk factors – Another danger associated with prehypertension is that it could present a number of risk factors commonly found in individuals suffering with cardiovascular disease. These include: High LDL cholesterol levels, blocked arteries, diabetes, obesity, strokes, and heart attacks, all of which have the potential to be fatal.

What are the main causes? – As mentioned, the main causes of prehypertension are believed to be directly linked to poor lifestyle choices, although genetics also are believed to play a role. Some of the main causes of prehypertension include:

Being obese or overweight – The larger a person’s body mass and body fat levels, the more oxygen, blood, and nutrients their bodies will need to be supplied to their cells. This gradually leads to an increase in blood volume, thus increasing the pressure and force being placed on the arteries.

Age – It is actually younger adults who are more likely to suffer from prehypertension, and sadly, that doesn’t mean that older adults are likely to be more healthy, it actually means that older adults are more likely to have moved onto hypertension instead.

Genetics – If you have a history of high blood pressure, or prehypertension in your family, you will be more at risk of developing the condition yourself. That doesn’t mean you will, it simply means you will need to be careful.

Unhealthy lifestyles – If you eat a lot of junk food, don’t get enough nutrients, don’t get enough exercise, smoke, drink excessively, use drugs, or anything else which is considered unhealthy, you are far more likely to develop prehypertension, which could quickly evolve into hypertension. Diets rich in salt and low in potassium are also strong risk factors.